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What are the names of the counties in
England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain)?









The counties of England are territorial divisions of England for the purposes of administrative, political and geographical demarcation. As well as being divide into counties, England is also broken up into regions.

There are 86 historic (or traditional) Counties of Great Britain, which have, of those in England, been in existence for over 800 years (many for centuries longer). Those of Wales and Scotland had also been fixed in name and area for several centuries. The historical counties were established for geographical reference.

There are currently 34 counties; all are divided into districts. In addition there are 46 unitary authorities and 238 district councils. These modern local authority areas were only created in 1889 (in England and Wales) and 1890 (in Scotland). Initially these areas were closely based upon the historic Counties but were always understood to be separate entities from the Counties themselves and, indeed, had separate terminology: they were labeled "administrative counties" and "county boroughs".

The Historic Counties of Great Britain

England (39 counties)

Bedfordshire,
Berkshire,
Buckinghamshire,
Cambridgeshire,
Cheshire,
Cornwall*,
Cumbria, (Cumberland)
Derbyshire,
Devon,
Dorset,
Durham,
Essex,
Gloucestershire,

Hampshire,
Hertfordshire,
Huntingdonshire,
Kent,
Lancashire,
Leicestershire,
Lincolnshire,
Middlesex,
Norfolk,
Northamptonshire,
Northumberland,
Nottinghamshire,
Oxfordshire,

Rutland,
Shropshire,
Somerset,
Staffordshire,
Suffolk,
Surrey,
Sussex,
Warwickshire,
Westmoreland,
Wiltshire,
Worcestershire,
Yorkshire

*Many individuals and groups in Cornwall maintain that Cornwall is not a part of England and assert that constitutionally it is a Duchy and nation of the UK.

Yorkshire is the largest traditional county of England.
6,000 square miles (15,000 sq km)
Population 5 Million
County Town (capital): York
In 1974 Yorshire was divided into three smaller counties - West, North and East Riding.

North Yorkshire is still Englands Largest county after the split in 1974. It covers 3212 square miles.

Rutland is traditionally England's smallest county
152 square miles ( 394 sq Km)
Population 32,400 (1991)
County Town (capital): Oakham
It is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire.

Wales (12 counties)

Anglesey/Sir Fon,
Brecknockshire/Sir Frycheiniog,
Caernarfonshire/Sir Gaernarfon,
Carmarthenshire/Sir Gaerfyrddin,
Cardiganshire/Ceredigion,
Denbighshire/Sir Ddinbych,
Flintshire/Sir Fflint,
  Glamorgan/Morgannwg,
Merioneth/Meirionnydd,
Monmouthshire/Sir Fynwy,
Montgomeryshire/Sir Drefaldwyn,
Pembrokeshire/Sir Benfro,
Radnorshire/Sir Faesyfed

Scotland (33 counties)

Aberdeenshire
Angus/Forfarshire
Argyllshire
Ayrshire
Banffshire
Berwickshire
Buteshire
Cromartyshire
Caithness
Clackmannanshire
Dumfriesshire
Dunbartonshire/Dumbartonshire
East Lothian/Haddingtonshire
Fife
Inverness-shire
Kincardineshire
Kinross-shire
 

Kirkcudbrightshire
Lanarkshire
Midlothian/Edinburghshire
Morayshire
Nairnshire
Orkney
Peeblesshire
Perthshire
Renfrewshire
Ross-shire
Selkirkshire
Shetland
Stirlingshire
Sutherland
West Lothian/Linlithgowshire
Wigtownshire

Traditional Counties of England followed by their county towns (capitals)

  • Bedfordshire - Bedford
  • Berkshire - Reading
  • Buckinghamshire - Aylesbury
  • Cambridgeshire - Cambridge
  • Cheshire - Chester
  • Cornwall - Truro
  • Cumberland - Carlisle
  • Derbyshire - was Derby, now Matlock
  • Devon - Exeter
  • Dorset - Dorchester
  • Durham - Durham
  • Essex - Chelmsford
  • Gloucestershire - Gloucester
  • Hampshire - Southampton, now Winchester
  • Herefordshire - Hereford
  • Hertfordshire - Hertford
  • Huntingdonshire - Huntingdon
  • Kent - Maidstone
  • Lancashire - Lancaster, now Preston
  • Leicestershire - Leicester, now Glenfield
  • Lincolnshire - Lincoln
  • Middlesex - Brentford, Clerkenwell or Westminster for different functions
  • Norfolk - Norwich
  • Northumberland - Alnwick, then Newcastle upon Tyne, now Morpeth
  • Northamptonshire - Northampton
  • Nottinghamshire - Nottingham
  • Oxfordshire - Oxford
  • Rutland - Oakham
  • Shropshire - Shrewsbury
  • Somerset - Somerton, now Taunton
  • Staffordshire - Stafford
  • Suffolk - Ipswich
  • Surrey - Guildford
  • Sussex - Chichester
  • Warwickshire - Warwick
  • Westmorland - Appleby
  • Wiltshire - Trowbridge
  • Worcestershire - Worcester
  • Yorkshire - traditionally York

 

Map of the present administrative counties of England

Map showing the counties of England

County Key:
Yorks = Yorkshire,
Wars = Warwickshire,
Leics = Leicestershire,
Mancs = Manchester,
Lancs = Lancashire,
Derbys = Derbyshire,
Staffs = Staffordshire,
Notts = Nottinghamshire,
Shrops = Shropshire,
Northants = Northamptonshire,
Herefs = Herefordshire,
Worcs = Worcestershire,
Bucks = Buckinghamshire,
Beds = Bedfordshire,
Cambs = Cambridgeshire,
Herts = Hertfordshire.

More information on the counties
(includes photos)
www.Pictures of England.com

 

Map above is from:
Map of England - Map of England, the counties, regions and more maps
www.Pictures of England.com

The Home Counties - The counties bordering London, ie Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Kent and Surrey

Regions of England

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Mandy is the creator of the Woodlands Resources section of the Woodlands Junior website. 
The two websites projectbritain.com and primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk are the new homes for the Woodlands Resources.

Mandy left Woodlands in 2003 to work in Kent schools as an ICT Consulatant. 
She now teaches computers at The Granville School and St. John's Primary School in Sevenoaks Kent.